Thursday, May 24, 2018

Why DRM Will Fail

DRM (digital rights management) is a hotly debated topic. The purpose of DRM is to secure digital music, games, movies; etc from piracy. However,...

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Why DRM Will Fail

Piracy_music_CD
DRM (digital rights management) is a hotly debated topic. The purpose of DRM is to secure digital music, games, movies; etc from piracy. However, all it really does is cause problems for both consumers and businesses alike. Why was it Implemented? DRM was created to combat piracy. It was intended to create havoc amongst digital pirates; however, so far this has not worked as intended. Instead of causing problems for hackers, consumers who actually purchased the product (s) were the ones who suffered. In some cases the DRM was so strict that individuals could only install the software a select number of times. After you passed the install limitation threshold, you could no longer install your software without having to call tech support. Then you would have to explain to them why you need to install more copies of the software, and they would (hopefully) allow it. DRM can also be used in digital music, which often leads to more annoyances. Instead of being able to listen to your music on your computer, your music player, phone; etc, you might be limited to just being able to use it on certain devices. And if you are like most people who buy digital music, you want the ability to use it wherever you want. Cause and Effect Ironically, DRM has probably hurt the businesses that use it more than it helps them. This is due to consumers either abandoning DRM content altogether, or because they have decided to pirate the content themselves. Thus, companies make less money. With any luck, this will encourage companies that once employed DRM in their digital content to abandon it altogether. Apple’s iTunes store appears to be heading down this road. At one time, the vast majority of the music on iTunes came with DRM installed; however, now more new songs appear to be DRM free. Amazon’s music store appears to be free of DRM music as well. appledrmfree2 Always Crackable The general consensus is that anything that is encoded with DRM can be cracked. And this appears to be true. No matter how complex the DRM is, individuals always seem to find a way to break the DRM codes. It may take a few days, but so far this has always been the case. With time, DRM will almost certainly fail. There are just too many people who are opposed to it, and in the end, a business wants to make a profit. And they can not do that when they use DRM.

The Apple IPad and DRM: Are DRM Restrictions Going to Kill the IPad?

ipad
Many of Apple’s digital rights management (DRM) policies have consumers wondering if the iPad is going to be a device worth buying. Many have criticized it as being “a large iphone”. In many ways, that is all it is. It is a hybrid device between a cell phone and a tablet. It is really a new kind of consumer device that fills a small niche in the market. Without the functionality of a full-fledged operating system, Apple is taking the rights out of consumer’s hands to be able to install any software they wish. Before I continue, I want to back up for a minute, and talk about what DRM really is. DRM is a service that content providers put in place to restrict access to music, programs, movies, or any kind of content. DRM is used by many companies, including Apple for their iTunes music store, Microsoft for their Zune Marketplace, Valve for their steam game distribution platform, and others. drm-free-apple-music However, the problem with DRM and the iPad is a unique one. The iPad is a strange mixture of phone and tablet laptop. Its operating system is essentially that of the iPhone, but with the hardware of a high-end net book, or a lower end tablet. The hardware would easily allow for a better operating system than the iPhone OS. The move by apple to use to iPhone OS over a customized OSX surprised many consumers. This decision allows users to be able to download and install software exclusively from the iTunes. Apple can effectively filter out any controversial, questionable, or obscene content. These kinds of restrictions on software are extremely detrimental to the future of computing. Other companies may follow Apple and release such DRM systems in their operating systems. Allowing for access to, and installation of software is an integral part of operating systems and of computer usage. Many companies will use DRM to curb piracy. However, there are more efficient ways to achieve this. Censoring the only means of application and content hurts consumers and developers. It goes against the foundation the internet was built upon, and will be a detriment to progress in computing.

Motorola and Apple Partners Again

Apple and Motorola have signed a new deal with Hunts International for removals to Ireland. For a long time Apple has been an almost exclusive user of Motorola’s CPUs. The G series of processors that Apple has used in its Macintosh computers are manufactured by Motorola. In this new deal, Apple is allowing Motorola to build a new cell phone that not only plays mp3s but also will be able to directly access Apple iTunes Music Store.  

Well, Here Is Another Load From the DRM People

MRG is offering a report on the current and future state of DRM and Content Protection. The report claims to be an exhaustive look at the needs that must be addressed if a company wants to compete in the new teleco world. In this new world supposidly everything will be available over your net connection. Video, data and voice will all be available but not unless it is locked away behind some kind of DRM and/or copy protection. Apparently if you do not BUY this report you will not be ready for the world of tomorrow. Apparently now not even reports can be had without the bloat associated with DRM content. I wonder how long it will be before this report is available for .99 on iTunes? But if you would like to have your very own copy now, you can purchase it for the very reasonable price of $1995. All 57 pages and 38 tables full of information can be yours, just contact Connie Lee at 408-524-9767 or info@mrgco.com for further information

EU Warns of DRM Privacy Threat

An influential European Union government advisory body has called for better protection of users’ privacy, which it says is being eroded in the midst of efforts to crack down on piracy. While copyright holders have a right to protect themselves from infringement, the EU Working Party on Data Protection in a new draft document expressed concern that “the legitimate use of technologies to protect works could be detrimental to the protection of personal data of individuals.” One step that could help is the development of tools that protect the user’s anonymity from DRM (digital rights management) technology, according to the group.

A Deal to Plug Analog Gap in Digital Media

Macrovision and Microsoft have teamed to expand a digital rights management licensing agreement that could help address the so-called analog gapthat allows digital media to break free of DRM protections. David Kaefer, Microsoft’s director of intellectual property licensing, said the company already uses Macrovision technology in its Windows Media Center 2005 platform. It is also making its way into the company’s XBox game console and will be popping up in other systems, such as Windows Mobile and MSN TV products. The entertainment industry also wants something that guarantees digital media distribution systems have protected content from getting “out in the clear” via “analog holes,” a term that describes how a user can ostensibly transfer digital media content from a digital device, then to an analog device such as a VCR, then move it back to a digital device. The companies said under the licensing agreement, Microsoft’s Windows Media DRM technologies will recognize the Macrovision signals, enabling temporary storage (time shifting) on digital devices of Macrovision-protected content received via analog interfaces. In addition, an Internet-delivered movie, downloaded to a PC, can now be protected on analog video playback out of a PC.

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